160,000 into 46,000 just won’t go

That would mean the rent charged on 114,000 homes occupied by claimants would suddenly be too pricy for the occupying claimants, leaving them at risk of losing their homes.
 
While some landlords may reduce rents in line with the new upper limit, there is a fear that the housing market in London is so strong that most would simply decide to keep their charges at the same level and let out their homes to non-claimants.
 
This would mean that many of the 114,000 households in the homes that would become too expensive would either have to crowd into the drastically reduced pool of affordable homes or leave the capital entirely.

The issue of families being ‘squeezed’ out of their existing properties is set to hit families across the capital, not only in expensive boroughs, such as Kensington and Chelsea, and Westminster, but also in areas such as Islington, Southwark and Lambeth.
 
The new research, based on official government figures, adds weight to growing concerns that the changes being proposed by the Government could force huge numbers of poor and vulnerable people to leave the capital, and move away from areas of employment opportunities, while pushing others into overcrowded conditions.
 
Official government statistics already show that the introduction of housing benefit caps will hit a range of vulnerable groups, such as low paid workers, single parents, people with disabilities and black and Asian households.
 
The proposed reduction of housing benefit allowances – called local housing allowances – is due to come into effect from October 2011.

Federation chief executive David Orr said: ‘London is one of the most vibrant and socially mixed cities in the world – and yet the diversity, for which it is so famous, is under threat from the Government’s proposal to bring all housing benefit allowances into line with the bottom third of rents.
 
‘The fact that the changes could push 160,000 vulnerable households into competing for just 46,000 homes is extremely worrying and morally wrong.
 
‘The situation could easily lead to housing benefit claimants being pushed out of huge swathes of the capital – including places such as Islington, Southwark and Lambeth.’
 
He added: ‘The Government has said all along that protecting the vulnerable is its priority – and yet the reduction of housing benefit allowances in line with the bottom third will hit the poorest Londoners the hardest.’

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0 thoughts on “160,000 into 46,000 just won’t go

  1. Major Landlord

    I have rarely read such arrant nonsense. There is a surplus of rented stock in most areas. If benefits are reduced, then there may well be some re-distribution of tenants to smaller and cheaper properties, but they will still find homes. Are landlords going to evict tenants when they have little propsect of finding anyone else? Of course not.

    Many landlords have been profiteering from the often over-generous LHA bandings since the new scheme was introduced. One tenant told me I could charge £150 per month MORE, as she was “entitled” to a higher figure than I was asking. I declined. All that will now happen is some greedy landlords will have to put their rents down again to pre-LHA levels.

    WHEN WILL ALL THE WHINGERS STOP WHINING ABOUT THE CUTS? 13 YEARS OF LABOUR WASTAGE HAVE PRODUCED A CRIPPLING DEFICIT WHICH WE NOW HAVE TO PAY BACK. EVERYONE WHO VOTED LABOUR IS NOW GETTING THEIR JUST DESSERTS, AND THEY ARE THE ONES WHO ARE SHOUTING LOUDEST. THE PARTY IS OVER. THE BILL HAS ARRIVED. WE ARE ALL IN THIS, WHETHER WE LIKE IT OR NOT. STOP WHINING AND GET ON WITH IT . . .