Radio 2 celebrates the spirit of local communities

As well as on-air programming throughout the week including Jeremy Vine, Steve Wright and Drivetime, listeners can also go to for more information and to find out if they are a good neighbour with Radio 2’s online quiz.

The initiative culminates on Bank Holiday Monday (25 May) with The Great British Street Party, a live three-hour show celebrating the very best in party music.

On Love Where You Live – Jeremy Vine today (18 May), Jeremy is joined by the BBC’s Home Editor, Mark Easton, who discusses how the notion of local community has changed in the UK.

Mark will also reveal the friendliest town in the UK and Jeremy will be speaking to listeners who have lived in the same house for most of their lives.

Jeremy Vine says: "This is a great one for us! It’s all about the connections you make in your street and your neighbourhood – in the same way that Radio 2 is about the connections between us all.

"I’m excited because it’ll take me back to the first house I lived in. I wish the treehouse my dad built was still at the end of the garden, but I fear it might not be after 40 years…"

Later, in Radio 2’s award-winning Drivetime show, this week presented by Simon Mayo, Jonny Saunders travels to the far-flung corners of the UK to visit local sports clubs and find out what role they play in local communities.

Every night this week (18-22 May), Janice Long will feature a fantastic act who has enlisted the help of the community.

From selling The Big Issue to performing in front of thousands, The King Blues play live on Monday and, on Tuesday, Jarvis Cocker talks about forming a band at the age of 15 that took 16 years to make it big.

Other bands include Birmingham-based The Lights, who enlisted the help of local neighbours and the worldwide internet community to make music, and Kid Rad, who tells Janice about the musical journey from his makeshift bedroom studio via community radio stations to performing live on Janice’s Radio 2 show.

Love Where You Live continues on Wednesday (20 May) when Sarah Kennedy is joined by Eleanor Rance, a chaplain with the RAF, for a special Pause For Thought. Eleanor talks about recently moving to a new house and getting to know her new neighbours.

Later on Wednesday, Jeremy Vine talks about whether life in blocks of flats fosters a different sense of community, and Steve Wright is joined by local news reporters who talk about the big stories from their community.

Terry Wogan is joined by the Archbishop of Canterbury, Rowan Williams, on Thursday (21 May) for a special Pause For Thought reflecting on the importance of the local community and the value of neighbourliness.

And, on Good Morning Sunday (24 May), Aled Jones is joined by Rev Steve Casey, pastor of Speke Baptist Church, Liverpool, to discuss how his church is reaching out to the local community.

Finally, Radio 2’s Love Where You Live initiative culminates on Bank Holiday Monday (25 May) with The Radio 2 Great British Street Party presented by Aled Jones and Melanie Sykes.

With three hours of the very best party music, the duo will also go live to Kate Thornton who presents live music from London’s Leicester Square. Acts will be announced at a later date.

The Radio 2 Great British Street Party encourages listeners to get together with their neighbours in their gardens or homes, perhaps for the first time, to help celebrate the local community.

Bob Shennan, Controller of Radio 2 and 6 Music, says: "BBC Radio 2 holds a mirror up to life and events in Great Britain and Love Where You Live is really important in allowing us to interact with our audience."

Full listings for Love Where You Live can be found at

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One thought on “Radio 2 celebrates the spirit of local communities

  1. Peter Lewis

    The local church used to be the centre of the community.

    Fresh expression of church are now trying the to put the church back there where it belongs i.e. not only as the centre of the community again but also as a trusted servant of the community with no hidden proselytising, political or other agenda. Just a firm belief in the value of community and a deep regret for the present loss of community spirit in many places.


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