Landlords challenged to give tenants a greater say

"Involving tenants in housing decision-making is central to good service delivery," he said. "Put simply, if social housing tenants are engaged and involved they are less likely to make complaints and there is less likely to be a need for the regulator or inspector to intervene.

"Research shows that when residents are involved in decision making, it can improve the way they perceive their landlord and be a solid basis for developing more positive, durable relationships between tenants and landlords."

Marsh used the example of the redevelopment of Hulme in Manchester, where the new Hulme residents had a say in the design process, choosing facilities and in managing properties. Follow-up surveys showed a high level of tenant satisfaction and a generally strong level of future commitment to stay in the area, he said.

"Tenant involvement – whether it’s more input in how local estate budgets are prioritised or more choice about what services to pay for through rent charges – should create a golden thread of engagement from the doorstep to the boardroom," he said.

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