Tenants fail to claim millions of pounds worth of deposits

Director of The DPS Kevin Firth explains: “We are committed to repaying deposits as quickly as possible, but unfortunately, some tenants are not keeping their contact details up to date – resulting in this large number of unpaid deposits. Once the tenancy has been registered with us, only the tenant can update their details, for security reasons.

“I must urge tenants to give us accurate and up to date information to ensure that their deposit money can be returned as quickly as possible at the end of the tenancy.”

The DPS has undertaken a review of its processes in order to make it easier to avoid deposits being held in limbo due to tenants not responding. 

“The review highlighted that if we had either a mobile number or valid email address for the lead tenant from the outset, the number of deposits held in limbo would be dramatically reduced, providing a better service for both landlords and tenants,” Kevin Firth explained.  “This is part of our continuous efforts to speed up the repayment process and reduce the number of outstanding deposits.”

In order to make a deposit repayment The DPS needs agreement from both the landlord / letting agent and the lead tenant, along with details of the correct payment method.

To further improve the successful scheme The DPS will be introducing the following changes to the on-line service:

– From 26th November, landlords will be required to provide either a UK mobile phone number or a valid email address for the lead tenant.

– One of these will be required as a minimum (both would be ideal). However, if tenants do not have any of this information then they should apply for a paper deposit submission form.

Early next year the DPS will also be introducing SMS text messaging to alert tenants when a deposit repayment has been initiated by their landlord or letting agent

Have your say on this story using the comment section below.

0 thoughts on “Tenants fail to claim millions of pounds worth of deposits

  1. JohnThorpe

    Is the DPS a Government Quango or is it a private company??
    Defaulting tenants will often leave owing the last months rent and owing money for repairs etc.
    They go to grear lengths to conceal where they are moving too because they owe the landlord cash..
    Kevin Firth of DPS appears a little naive. It would be a good idea for him to get some first hand experience by trying his hand at being a landlord hinself.

  2. Major Landlord

    Tenants are only too quick to demand the repayment of their deposits at the end of their tenancies, whether or not the landlord has had the opportunity to assess whether any deduction might be necessary.

    I therefore find it unbelievable that 8000 of them have decided not to bother to contact DPS to demand their money back.

    I agree with John Thorpe: there must be a reason. (Maybe Mr Firth has simply lost the landlords’ claims file, and this is money in dispute??!!)

    And why anybody should meanwhile waste any time worrying about returning the money fails me. If somebody owed you money, you’d ask for it, wouldn’t you?

    But if they don’t want it, give it to the landlords against an undertaking that they will pay it on if/when asked to do so. Let’s face it, most landlords these days suffer some breakages etc at the end of a tenancy, but no longer bother to deduct for them because of the hoops they have to jump through to substantiate their claims. This is a rare opportunity to pay them for the losses they normally absorb.

    By the way, I’m a landlord – does it show??!!!