London buyer registrations shoot up by 50% annually

London buyer registrations are up by 50% annually as demand for property goes into overdrive according to the latest Sequence National Housing Market Index

There is now almost 12 new buyers for every new instruction while new instructions in the Capital have decreased by 1% on month, rising just 17% annually: less than a third of the rate of demand.

UK buyer registrations have risen by 4% on month and 24% annually ahead of the fast-tracked government Help to Buy scheme.

UK property instructions have dropped by 2% on month, growing just 4% annually: six times slower than annual buyer registrations.

In comparison UK house are prices are flat on month but have increased 7% annually to £204,340. London prices have dipped 2% on month but risen 6% annually

First time buyers have flooded into the market, with applications up 46% annually and 4% on month.

David Plumtree, Chief Executive at Sequence, comments: “We have been deluged by new buyer activity in the last month proving that the aspiration for home ownership across the UK, and in London in particular, is very much alive and growing. As a result there are almost 12 buyers for every property in London and six buyers for every property across the UK.

“This growing competition for property is now impacting on house prices, which have grown by an average of 7% annually in the UK and 6% in London. Demand is set to escalate yet further following the Government’s fast-tracked introduction of Help to Buy to the pre-owned market, so competition for property is only going to increase, fanning the flames for frustrated buyers.

“However, second and third steppers across the country should now be encouraged to put their property on the market, incentivised by rising prices, a ready pool of buyers and now also the chance to access a 95% mortgage themselves. This will increase the supply of property in the short term and create a more balanced market across the UK.”

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