Letting agent urges landlords to boost green credentials

Carl Mimmack, whose company offers apartments for couples or larger properties to suit families said: "As part of the new Home Information Pack legislation, it is essential that all properties should have an Energy Performance Certificate (EPC). This should be available to tenants when they first move in, as a way of giving landlords the encouragement they need to improve the energy efficiency of their property and in turn help the environment."

Property owners will often overlook insulation, but it can help to reduce problems in the long-term with damp, mould and condensation, and if the landlord does decide to sell at any point in the future, these problems will need to be assessed. More than half a home’s heat is lost through the internal walls and this will inevitably raise the cost of your energy bills and reduce a landlord’s profit margins.

Mr Mimmack added: "Cavity walls can easily be insulated for a few hundred pounds, and with the money you can save over a few months, this can be very worthwhile project. Alternatively, draught proofing can also be very effective at cutting heating bills, and is often covered under the landlord’s energy-saving allowance."

Energy saving bulbs in all fixtures and fittings can also help to reduce your carbon footprint and cut energy bills, according to the Energy Saving Trust website.

Mr Mimmack said: "In light of recent Government initiatives to turn just about everything green, we have seen the introduction of gas-powered vehicles, the absence of the trusty carrier bag and even a new trend for environmentally-friendly furniture, so there really is no better time for landlords to go green. Installing foil panel radiators, choosing a high efficiency-condensing boiler with heating controls to help to combat C02 emissions and giving tenants green advice on everything from recycling to turning off appliances after use, can all have a very positive effect."

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