Jobs boom pushes serious rent arrears down 4%

Fewer tenants are falling into serious rent arrears thanks to the improving employment market, according to letting agents Your Move and Reeds Rains.

In absolute terms, just 86,200 tenants across the UK are more than two months behind in their rent. This compares to 89,300 in the previous quarter. This represents a 4% fall and means that 3,100 households in homes to let have moved out of serious rent arrears since the end of 2015. Continue reading

Cost of renting one-bed property soars in UK

The cost of renting a one-bedroom property in the UK has risen to swallow almost half of the average young worker’s take-home pay, according to figures, while those living in London are typically handing over 57% of their monthly wages.

The average cost of a new tenancy on a one-bedroom home hit £746 a month in May, taking up 48% of the take-home pay of a worker aged under 30, data from property firm Countrywide showed. Continue reading

Designer villages where house prices are over £1 million

Who wants to be a property millionaire? As house prices continue to rocket, particularly in the commuter belt, more village residents are winning.
This year, eight villages in Essex, Surrey, Greater Manchester, Hertfordshire and Hampshire, have joined the so-called “Millionaires’ Club”, where average asking prices, recorded by Rightmove, have leapfrogged the £1 million mark.

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17th century castle empty for 20 years is going under the hammer

An incredible 17th century abandoned Italian castle is set to go under the hammer in mint condition – despite being left empty for 20 years.
The Castello di Sammezzano in Tuscany, Italy, was built in the early 17th century by Spanish nobles and was even visited by Emperor Charlemagne, before it was turned into a hotel-restaurant.

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Oxford named the hardest place to buy a home in Britain for first time buyers

Oxford is the toughest town for first time buyers to get a foot on the UK property ladder, taking over from Brighton as the country’s premium property hotspot. Bradford & Hull, on the other hand, proved the most affordable, according to new analysis by job search engine Adzuna.co.uk.

The research shows that nearly three quarters (72%) of homes in Bradford fall within financial reach for first-time buyers on average local incomes. London, High Wycombe, Reading and Brighton are amongst the most unaffordable places to purchase first properties as wages stagnate and property prices soar across Britain.  Continue reading

UK housing market dips for first time in 12 months

Interest from UK house buyers has dropped for the first time since March 2015, as uncertainty continues to affect the market, according to the latest RICS UK Residential Market Survey. 

Following the buy-to-let rush that preceded the 1 April tax rise deadline, and with continued uncertainty caused by the EU Referendum, interest from buyers dropped in April with 22% more chartered surveyors reporting a drop in demand.  Continue reading

Stamp duty: New rule quirk means ordinary people will pay more

When a higher rate of stamp duty was announced by the Chancellor last November, it was meant to cool the boom in buy-to-let.
Under the new rules, applying from April 1 this year, anyone buying a property who already owned another property would pay the usual rate of stamp duty – plus a three percentage point surcharge.
This means a buyer’s tax bill could increase by thousands of pounds.
For example, on a property worth £300,000, the charge would increase from £5,000 to £14,000.
George Osborne’s intention was to deter property investors and leave more property free for young families.
But the rules are having unexpected consequences for many. These are people who don’t put themselves in the same bracket as buy-to-let investors, but who nevertheless have discovered that they will have to pay the extra amount when they move, buy a family home or downsize.

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The housing bubble is finally bursting – here’s what that means for you

Is it possible that homes are, at last, about to become more affordable? The Government announced last summer, at the Conservative party conference in Manchester, that, having won the general election, it was going to grasp the housing problem by the windpipe and sort it.
That energised Brandon Lewis, the Duracell-powered housing minister, and the Government came up with a raft of initiatives – including, most surprisingly perhaps, that investing in homes as a financial asset should be discouraged. Generation Own, rather than Generation Rent, was the aim.

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